eParticipation

How will Barack Obama employ social media as president?

What a wonderful day! And plenty of observers have already noted the key role that the Internet and social media played in the successful campaign of Barack Obama. But the question that strikes me is: when he’s President, how will he utilize the hundreds of thousands of MySpace friends, Facebook fans, Twitter followers, My.BarackObama.com members, and SMS opt-ins, just to name a few, to advance his policies and­ ­­politics­? Are we on the verge of a new era of eParticipation in politics?

eParticipation - Electronic Participation of Citizens and the Business Community in eGovernment

Recently released: In 2007 the German Federal Ministry of the Interior has ordered a study ”eParticipation - Electronic Participation of Citizens and the Business Community in eGovernment”, to review current practices of eParticipation in Germany and generate recommendations for future activities. The results of the study have been presented to Minister of the Interior Wolfgang Schäuble in Mai 2008. The Study is now available in English and can be downloaded h­ere >>

Tips for text-to-screen campaigns

­Since we launched TextTheMob I'm keeping my eyes open for good case studies and best practices on how to use mobile technology to support eParticipation efforts. I recently discovered MobileActive.org, a great network of practitioners that has put together a quick guide of How to Run a Text-to-Screen Campaign:

Text to screen can function as a unique way for advocacy groups to use interactive media to

  • build a database of mobile phone numbers for future use
  • show the opinions and demands of a constituency/the public to decision makers in a highly visible manner
  • generate media and public attention.
They follow with a case study, a good list of questions to ask yourself before starting and a step-by-step guide on how to set it up. A quick read, definitely worth your time if you're looking into utilizing mobile technology as part of your efforts.

 

eParticipation Consultant at Public Agenda

I'm excited to announce that I recently started to work for Public Agenda as a consultant. I'm coming on board as a Public Engagement Associate and will help them identify online strategies to support their choicework approach.
 

The POST Method: A systematic approach to social strategy

One of the biggest takeaways from the fabulous book Groundswell - winning in a world transformed by social technologies, which I just finished reading, was the POST Method as a simple framework of how to approach social software:

Is your company [organization] doing its social strategy backwards?

If you started by saying "we should do a blog" or "we should create a page on a social network" or "we should create a community" the answer is probably yes.

post_method_2I've been there and am confronted with this approach pretty often in our work. Following the POST Method seems obvious, but it's important to re­mind ourselves frequently to go through the steps one after the other. Whether you're a customer care agent selling cheap airfare or an urban planner trying to capture citizen feedback online, the POST method gives you a simple tool to ­participate successfully on the social web:

P is People. Don't start a social strategy until you know the capabilities of your audience. If you're targeting college students, use social networks. If you're reaching out business travelers, consider ratings and reviews. Forrester has great  data to help with this, but you can make some estimates on your own. Just don't start without thinking about it.

O is objectives. Pick one. Are you starting an application to listen to your customers, or to talk with them? To support them, or to energize your best customers to evangelize others? Or are you trying to collaborate with them? Decide on your objective before you decide on a technology. Then figure out how you will measure it.

S is Strategy. Strategy here means figuring out what will be different after you're done. Do you want a closer, two-way relationship with your best customers? Do you want to get people talking about your products? Do you want a permanent focus group for testing product ideas and generating new ones? Imagine you succeed. How will things be different afterwards? Imagine the endpoint and you'll know where to begin.

T is Technology. A community. A wiki. A blog or a hundred blogs. Once you know your people, objectives, and strategy, then you can decide with confidence.

This may sound simple to the sophisticated readers of this blog. But it works. Try it. Think your strategy through. Even if you're just clarifying your own strategy, this should help you explain it to your boss.

You can find more information about the book and its authors on their blog >>

TextTheMob.com now in public beta

cover We spent some time over the last weeks building a web application that allows presenters, event organizers and others to set up polls and message boards to be displayed on screens or monitors and their audience to respond with their mobile phone (text message or mobile webpage) - http://textthemob.com. It's time to move forward, so take a look, play with and let us know what your reactions are - bug reports, feature suggestions and any ideas on how this could be (more) useful. And please forward...

OpenWebDay Focuses on Online Participation in Democracy

OneWebDay

From the OneWebDay website: 

OneWebDay is one day a year when we all - everyone around the physical globe - can celebrate the Web and what it means to us as individuals, organizations, and communities.

 

The idea behind OneWebDay is to:

  • focus attention on a key internet value (this year, online participation in democracy)
  • focus attention on local internet concerns (connectivity, censorship, individual skills)
  • create a global constituency that cares about protecting and defending the internet

We’re building towards September 22, a Monday this year.

Curious to see what activities around online participation in democracy will be offered.  

What is mParticipation and what does it bring to the table?

Stefan Höffken at Zebralog has a nice post on mParticipation at the new PEP-Net Blog:

Mobile Participation (mParticipation) seems to be the next step in ePartizipation. With the rising of the iPhone and other smart phones and combined with other features like GPS and Location Based Services the expectations for new applications for are high. Consequently mobile applications amplify eParticipation in an spatial and temporal dimension. Not only at home, but also e.g. traveling in the metro, participants are enabled to read, write and follow the discussions.

While the discussion about mParticipation itself is not new, the debate about its benefits is changing with new phones and features coming out on a weekly basis. At this point, I feel the question is, what do we call mParticipation and where is the difference to what we consider eParticipation?
In my eyes, using smartphones to participate in online dialogues or consultation processes shouldn't be considered mParticipation. Technologies change and a couple of years from now I doubt there's going to be any differentiation whether citizens use desktop PCs, laptops, xBoxes, mobile devices or whatever online-enabled device comes next to participate in eParticipation projects.
 
Where I agree with Stefan, and feel some of the comments are coming short, is the added value mobile devices can bring to the table - the core of mParticipation. Stefan points out that
"even if SMS only offer limited possibilities (because of the restriction to 160 signs) in comparison to mobile internet devices, there are arguments for integration in participation processes. They are an easy to use feature, they are cheap, they can be integrated to web (and vice versa). Looking at demoscopic data, they even offer more advantages."
The point is they are ubiquitous, basically everyone on the street carries them. This is the true value which we need to explore further - how do we best use mobile devices as points-of-entry to the main engagement offering: a short question, first statements, spatial annotations, etc. that are context-sensitive and make the connection between project and everyday life of our target audiences. And responses with further information and automatic opt-ins into a contact database are bridges that can help to turn interested passerbys into engaged participants. The design of those kinds of cross-media participation processes is still in its infancy. I barely know good examples in the field (any pointers?), but looking at the shifts going on in the marketing world, there's a lot of potential.

Finally, I believe we shouldn't get hung up in discussions about whether mParticipation is a next step (e.g. here and here), but an addition to the toolset with a lot of potential that still needs to prove its true benefits.

Zilino - Your friendly e-participation engine

Curious to see what Tim and his colleagues are working on...

PEP-Net launched: New european eParticipation Network

My colleague Hans Hagedorn just came back from the PEP-Net Kick-Off:

PEP-NET will be a European network of all stakeholders active in the field of eParticipation. PEP-NET therefore already includes public bodies, solution providers and citizen organizations as well as researchers and scientists. The network is open to all organizations willing and actively trying to advance the idea and use of eParticipation in Europe.

The project aims to help overcome fragmentation and promote best practice by connecting established and experienced eParticipation players and networks throughout Europe as a critical first step. The objective of this project is to achieve critical mass for the establishment of a Pan European eParticipation Network (PEP-NET). Such a network will act as a repository and disseminator of good practice and exchange of experience, and be a visible resource for all interested parties across the European Union.

PEP-NET will ensure wider access to European eParticipation projects and permit more effective dialogue between eParticipation experts, researchers, practitioners, public administrations, civil society organisations and the interested public with the ultimate goal of facilitating knowledge transfer, encouraging further eParticipation trials and establishing European leadership in this field.

 

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